PREDATOR CONTROL TRAINING DAY

The first predator control training day for the Endeavour Inlet Conservation Trust was held on January 28 2010 in the baking hot sun in The Pines.  Nearly 40 people were in attendance to learn what tools are available tools to use, the best practice in their application and some of the finer details of attracting … Continue reading

DOC200’s ON THE GROUND

The first 30 DOC 200 traps being delivered to Endeavour Inlet by the Cougar Line. On christmas eve 2010 the first 30 DOC200 traps were set out.  At approximately 200 metre intervals the traps spread from the first seat to the south of the pines all the way to the farmland at the head of … Continue reading

THANKS COUGAR LINE!

A huge thanks to Mark and Jill at the Cougar Line for their generous support with transporting traps out to Endeavour Inlet.  The team at Cougar Line is fantastic and we look forward to working with them for a long time to come.

PREDATOR CONTROL TRAINING DAY

Want to know how to control introduced predators?  Keen to meet some other locals who are interested too? Community event: Tuesday December 28th A training session & BBQ lunch is being held on December 28th to help get people started in controlling introduced pests.  A full suite of tools and traps will be demonstrated, best … Continue reading

MEET SOME OF OUR LOCALS: Weka

“Historically, the weka was a significant resource for some iwi, and the birds’ availability for sustainable harvest (mahinga kai) remains an important issue in weka conservation. Weka were also used by early European settlers, who gave it the name woodhen.” http://www.doc.govt.nz

MEET SOME OF OUR PESTS: STOAT – Mustela ermina

Stoats and weasels are similar in colour and general appearance, but stoats are larger, have longer tails and a straight line where the brown fur on their backs meets the white belly fur. From 350-400mm long from nose to tip of tail, the stoat is reddish-brown above, white to yellowish underneath, and has a long … Continue reading

MEET SOME OF OUR PESTS: Felis catus

“ It is estimated that feral cats have been responsible for the extinction of six endemic bird species and over 70 localised subspecies as well as depleting bird and lizard species.[19]“

THANKS DOC!

Local Picton Department of Conservation has graciously lent us 30 DOC200 traps for the control of stoats (and bonus rats and hedgehogs) and a set of Victor legholds for undertaking possum monitoring and control. Thanks to Phil, Roy, Frank, Robin and Willie for their keenness and generosity.

EARLY STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT

Following is a proposed strategy for establishment of the traps in the field. It is based on best practice DOC recommendations and the Inlets landscape and existing networks. This is the initial concept with the aim to have the final strategy completed over the coming weeks including a few extra considerations raised, such as creating … Continue reading